April 16, 2014
laughterkey:

aatombomb:



Angela Lansbury officially becomes Dame

True royalty.

The best.


hail hail my queen

laughterkey:

aatombomb:

Angela Lansbury officially becomes Dame

True royalty.

The best.

hail hail my queen

(Source: rte.ie, via aspiringpolymath)

April 16, 2014
brianna-ashby:

The Magnificent Andersons: the brand new issue of Bright Wall/Dark Room Magazine, devoted entirely to the films of Wes Anderson and Paul Thomas Anderson, is now available! Visit Bright Wall/Dark Room for more! 

brianna-ashby:

The Magnificent Andersons: the brand new issue of Bright Wall/Dark Room Magazine, devoted entirely to the films of Wes Anderson and Paul Thomas Anderson, is now available! Visit Bright Wall/Dark Room for more! 

April 16, 2014

Radar has a superhero persona, created by my friend Brandi and me: the Scrambler: a well-intentioned hero of incredible strength who bursts on the scene to saves the day but makes a huge mess in the process.

“Help us, Scrambler!” the people cry, on the precipice of some terrible disaster.

“Scrambler, no!” they cry again, as he knocks them over the edge with his enthusiasm and good intentions.

- Elisabets: Choice Horses and Bad Dogs by Elisabeth Geier (aka whathappened)

My latest column is about how my bad dog keeps me alive.

(Source: yearbookoffice)

April 13, 2014

On Sundays I take the dogs for a long walk around the neighborhood and look at houses up for sale. My favorite one lately is a light pink midcentury ranch just around the corner, one block down from where we live. Through the wide front window I can see built-in cabinets in the dining room that will display my knick-knacks perfectly. There’s a fenced back yard and a small garden shed painted the same shade of pink.

Neighbors out for their own Sunday walks laugh when they overhear me talking to the dogs:

"What about this house? Do you like this house? When are you going to get a job and buy me this house?"

My job barely covers rent for our basement apartment with concrete floors. On Friday night, my debit card was rejected at a pizza-by-the-slice place; yesterday, I sent my dad an e-mail with the subject line I’m sorry, I’m trying. Home ownership will never be in the cards, and so it has become an obsession, the impossible dream of a house, no shared walls or footsteps overhead.

The For Sale sign says there’s a finished basement complete with a bar, and photos reveal a little wood-paneled bedroom with built-in bunk beds, like  sleeping quarters on a ship. I see the dogs stacked in these bunks like sailors, retiring to their cabin after a long day at sea, the sea being life in our little pink house, rearranging dishes on shelves, reading on the screened-in porch, a midafternoon romp in a yard of our own, garden tools and miscellaneous hardware in the shed, the gentle roll and sway of staying put.

April 8, 2014
jordanmorris:

Jordan Jesse Go! and Stop Podcasting Yourself LIVE in the Pacific Northwest!
April 25th - Portland
April 26th - Seattle
Special guests at EACH SHOW!  Come on out!  Reblog if you’re coming!

YYYUUUUUUUUUUUUUPPPPPP

jordanmorris:

Jordan Jesse Go! and Stop Podcasting Yourself LIVE in the Pacific Northwest!

April 25th - Portland

April 26th - Seattle

Special guests at EACH SHOW!  Come on out!  Reblog if you’re coming!

YYYUUUUUUUUUUUUUPPPPPP

(via daveshumka)

April 7, 2014

bearhatalice:

I heard she got a shelter dog, a rescue cat, a theremin, a moped, a bicycle. She joined a car share, a noise punk band, a church, a co-op garden.

- Everything Ever by Alice Lee (aka bearhatalice)

I wrote about how I always have the exact same conversations with my friends and how I love that. Please read it!

Required Reading, 4/7/2014

(Source: yearbookoffice)

April 7, 2014
Episode 3: Rebecca Schiff & Leslie Jamison

catapultreads:

First, some musings: How much of a book can be bad and the book is still good? How many pages of picking up speed would you ask your friends to slog through to get to a book you really loved? How much of books I read ten years ago do I really remember? These questions, and more, are posed in the…

The Catapult is my new favorite podcast (and my favorite new podcast). HIGHLY RECOMMENDED if you enjoy contemporary creative writing of all genres and hearing writers’ work in their own voices. Plus a charming host, to boot!

April 2, 2014
happy accidents

happy accidents

March 30, 2014

(Source: brutereason, via bearhatalice)

March 30, 2014
brightwalldarkroom:

Excerpt from the new issue: Elisabeth Geier on Quantum Leap:



“What if you could go back in time? asked anyone who ever regretted anything. Do the one thing you always wished you had done. Unmake your biggest mistake. It’s a soothing fantasy, and Dr. Sam Beckett (Scott Bakula in his prime) believes it is possible. His study in string theory supports a lifetime that can be tangled up in itself, so when he steps into the Quantum Leap accelerator, he can leap into any year in his own lived past. (Try not to worry about the science too much.) The possibilities for change are endless, or would be, if Sam had any control over when and where he ended up. Instead of landing in his own life, in his own form, he “leaps” into the lives and bodies of others. And so, Dr. Sam Beckett sets off on a metaphysical journey of reinvention, not for himself, but for strangers in time.
He woke to find himself trapped in the past, facing mirror images that were not his own, and driven by an unknown force to change history for the better.
Quantum Leap ran on NBC for five seasons, during which Dr. Sam Beckett inhabited almost 100 lives, each episode a new face in the mirror, and each face a new set of problems to solve. Some of the faces are famous (Lee Harvey Oswald, Elvis, Dr. Ruth), or at least fame-adjacent (Jack Kerouac’s friend, Marilyn Monroe’s chauffeur, Stephen King’s creepy neighbor). Most of them are regular Americans, representative of the historical and pop cultural standards of their time: a 1960’s girl group; a 1970’s mafia apprentice; a 1980’s beauty pageant contestant; a reluctant inductee) to the Ku Klux Klan; a college student protesting the Vietnam war; a housewife at the height of women’s lib. Sam’s leaping takes us on a tour of the second half of the 20th century, hitting every major historical event, political movement, and social justice issue along the way. Wherever he ends up, Sam’s main motivation is to save lives, whether that means preventing an unnecessary death or stopping someone from making a bad mistake. The show hits hard on the idea that human history is made up of individual moments, decisions, and lives. Sam leaps in to fix one person’s life, and once it’s fixed, he can leap out.”
(illustration by Brianna Ashby)





To read the rest of this essay, download the Bright Wall/Dark Room app to your iPhone or iPad for free, or subscribe online for $2 to receive immediate access to the entire issue.

brightwalldarkroom:

Excerpt from the new issue: Elisabeth Geier on Quantum Leap:

What if you could go back in time? asked anyone who ever regretted anything. Do the one thing you always wished you had done. Unmake your biggest mistake. It’s a soothing fantasy, and Dr. Sam Beckett (Scott Bakula in his prime) believes it is possible. His study in string theory supports a lifetime that can be tangled up in itself, so when he steps into the Quantum Leap accelerator, he can leap into any year in his own lived past. (Try not to worry about the science too much.) The possibilities for change are endless, or would be, if Sam had any control over when and where he ended up. Instead of landing in his own life, in his own form, he “leaps” into the lives and bodies of others. And so, Dr. Sam Beckett sets off on a metaphysical journey of reinvention, not for himself, but for strangers in time.

He woke to find himself trapped in the past, facing mirror images that were not his own, and driven by an unknown force to change history for the better.

Quantum Leap ran on NBC for five seasons, during which Dr. Sam Beckett inhabited almost 100 lives, each episode a new face in the mirror, and each face a new set of problems to solve. Some of the faces are famous (Lee Harvey OswaldElvisDr. Ruth), or at least fame-adjacent (Jack Kerouac’s friend, Marilyn Monroe’s chauffeur, Stephen King’s creepy neighbor). Most of them are regular Americans, representative of the historical and pop cultural standards of their time: a 1960’s girl group; a 1970’s mafia apprentice; a 1980’s beauty pageant contestant; a reluctant inductee) to the Ku Klux Klan; a college student protesting the Vietnam war; a housewife at the height of women’s lib. Sam’s leaping takes us on a tour of the second half of the 20th century, hitting every major historical event, political movement, and social justice issue along the way. Wherever he ends up, Sam’s main motivation is to save lives, whether that means preventing an unnecessary death or stopping someone from making a bad mistake. The show hits hard on the idea that human history is made up of individual moments, decisions, and lives. Sam leaps in to fix one person’s life, and once it’s fixed, he can leap out.”

(illustration by Brianna Ashby)


To read the rest of this essay, download 
the Bright Wall/Dark Room app to your iPhone or iPad for free, or subscribe online for $2 to receive immediate access to the entire issue.

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