what happened?

Aug 18

[video]

Aug 15

brightwalldarkroom:

"Carpe diem. Seize the day, boys. Make your lives extraordinary."
—
(illustration by Brianna Ashby)

brightwalldarkroom:

"Carpe diem. Seize the day, boys. Make your lives extraordinary."

(illustration by Brianna Ashby)

Aug 14

[video]

Aug 13

Twitter Feeds Reporting from Ferguson -

fishingboatproceeds:

Couldn’t find a list like this, so…

Wesley Lowery, Washington Post journalist who was arrested while sitting in a McDonald’s.

Local alderman Antonio French.

Huffington Post journalist Ryan Reilly, who was also arrested while reporting on the protests.

Local TV reporter Christina…

erikamoen:

"I Want to Live"
I drew this comic yesterday and today it’s up on The Nib.

Lovely and moving and something I aspire to, if that makes sense.

erikamoen:

"I Want to Live"

I drew this comic yesterday and today it’s up on The Nib.

Lovely and moving and something I aspire to, if that makes sense.

“To ascribe this entirely to contempt for black men is to miss an essential variable, though—a very real, American fear of them. They—we—are inexplicably seen as a millions-strong army of potential killers, capable and cold enough that any single one could be a threat to a trained police officer in a bulletproof vest. There are reasons why white gun’s rights activists can walk into a Chipotle restaurant with assault rifles and be seen as gauche nuisances while unarmed black men are killed for reaching for their wallets or cell phones, or carrying children’s toys.” — America Is Not For Black People by Greg Howard (via kfan)

(via bearhatalice)

Aug 12

Know what is happening in Ferguson -

tfsiosociety:

Know that Mike Brown was murdered without reason.
Know they left his body out, like they left out lynched Black folk to scare people
Know his community was grieving
Know they wanted solidarity and justice
Know they protested peacefully
Know they gathered
Know the police…

(via sarahb)

[video]

Aug 11

pulpfictions:

"And did you get what you wanted from this life, even so? I did. And what did you want? To call myself beloved, to feel myself beloved on the earth.”
—Raymond Carver, “Late Fragment”

pulpfictions:

"And did you get what
you wanted from this life, even so?
I did.
And what did you want?
To call myself beloved, to feel myself
beloved on the earth.”

—Raymond Carver, “Late Fragment”

Rest in Peace, Robin Williams -

paulftompkins:

One of the first comedy albums I was ever given was “Reality… What A Concept.” I loved it. I loved “Mork & Mindy.” I even loved Robert Altman’s “Popeye.” Robin Williams meant a lot to me when I was a kid. I knew nothing of drug use or depression. It never occurred to me that comedians, these magical creatures that I worshiped, ever felt anything other than the serene satisfaction derived from making people laugh.

Eventually, I started doing standup myself, and I very quickly learned that comedians were all too human. There is no less sadness in the comedy community than there is in any other workforce; that is to say, jobs are jobs and people are people and no occupation makes anyone depression-proof. This both comforts and frustrates me.

Robin Williams made me laugh so many times. So many times. When I was a kid, having problems of my own, feeling unpleasantly different from the people who populated my world, I found sanctuary watching this guy on TV who was celebrated for being a weirdo, for being an oddball, for being silly. He was praised for having a mind that produced delightful absurdities with great speed. No one told him to be quiet. No one tried to make him act like everyone else. He was a hero to me.

I had occasion to meet him once, not too long ago, and he could not have been nicer or friendlier or calmer. He was just there to watch the show that was happening that night. He wasn’t trying to get on stage; he just — still — loved comedy.

I didn’t tell him any of the things I just wrote here. No doubt, he heard similar things from countless people over his decades-long career. And it’s a colossal shame that being a meaningful presence in the lives of many people, family, friends and strangers alike, isn’t an impenetrable bulwark against despair. It’s profoundly unfair that, if he couldn’t live forever, he couldn’t at least feel able to keep going for his allotted time. I know something of depression, and how bottomless and relentless and insurmountable it feels, but I have never known the unfathomable despair that Robin Williams must have felt. I can’t even begin to imagine it.

Robin Williams will live on in shadows and light and sound, at least. He will continue to comfort weird little kids (and odd adults, for that matter) with his performances, those who know his work today and those who have yet to be born, who may experience him ten, fifty, a hundred years from now. But this is cold comfort indeed.

There will be much celebration, in the coming weeks and months, of Robin Williams’ life and career. But perhaps the best tribute to him would be if we all reached out to the troubled people in our lives and let them know that we are here for them. Because Robin Williams was there for us.

(Source: fusion.net)